Historical Plaques of
Perth County

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PLAQUE #1

Location: Highway #7/8 east of Shakespeare

FRYFOGEL'S INN
Erected about 1844-45, this building was situated on the Huron Road, a pioneer highway which opened up the Canada Company's Huron Tract. Its original owner, Sebastian Fryfogel, said to be the first settler in Perth County, was operating a partially completed log Inn on this property in December, 1828. The Inn became a favourite stopping place for travellers and persons settling in the Huron Tract. Fryfogel held various important municipal offices, became the first Warden of Perth County in 1851, and died on June 10, 1873. His Inn remains one of the few examples in this area of Upper Canadian Neo-Classic architecture.

Archives and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #2

Location: Highway #7/8 east of Shakespeare

ERECTED 1928

TO COMMEMORATE

OPENING HURON ROAD

BY THE CANADA COMPANY

1828

THIS MARKS PLACE OF

LOG BUILDING OCCUPIED BY

SEBASTIAN and MARY

FRYFOGEL

FIRST SETLLERS IN

PERTH COUNTY 1829

AMOS FRYFOGEL

The property on which the above Cairn stands was donated to the Perth County Historical Foundation in Canada's Centennial Year 1967 by Amos Fryfogel, great grandson of Sebastian Fryfogel who established the Inn in 1828

The next 4 plaques were sent in by Don Holmes & Marilyn Mills

PLAQUE #3

Location: Howie Morenz Park, Mitchell Ontario, at the NE corner
of the intersection of Provincial Hwys 23 & 8

HOWIE MORENZ 1902-1937
An outstanding hockey player, Howard William Morenz was born in Mitchell. He began his career with the Mitchell Juveniles, 1917-18, and after his family moved to Stratford, he played with several teams there. His skilful play, characterized by exceptionally fast skating and intense concentration, brought the "Stratford Streak" offers from several professional teams and in 1923 he joined the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League. His success was immediate and he remained in the League for 14 years, 12 with Montreal. So great were his popularity and appeal that he made a major contribution to the League's success during its early years. He died following a severe injury suffered in play. In 1950 Morenz was voted the outstanding hockey player of the half century by Canadian Press.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #4

Location: Mitchell Park, Mitchell Ontario, on the NE corner
Provincial Hwys 23 & 8

THE FOUNDING OF MITCHELL
In 1836 the Canada Company , a large private land settlement agency, laid out a town plot (Mitchell) here on the Huron Road. Within a year John Hicks, one of Logan Township's earliest settlers, had erected a hotel near this point where the road crossed the Thames River. Although settlement proceeded slowly at first, a sawmill was in operation by 1842. Following the opening of the Mitchell-Blanshard Road in 1845 stores and other mills were built and in 1851 the population had reached 150. The arrival of the Buffalo and Lake Huron Railroad in 1857 greatly stimulated the development of Mitchell and it was incorporated as a Village in that year. In 1874 with a population of some 2000 it became a Town.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Ministry of Colleges and Universities

PLAQUE #5

Location: On the east side of Provincial Hwy. 23 about 500m north
of the village of Kirkton, Township of Blanshard

TIMOTHY EATON 1834-1907
Born at Clogher, County Antrim in northern Ireland, Timothy Eaton emigrated to Canada about 1854. In 1856, he and his brother James opened a general store of log construction about a quarter mile from this site in the hamlet of Kirkton. From 1860 to 1868 the Eaton brothers operated a dry goods business in the nearby community of St. Mary's. In the latter year Timothy moved to Toronto. There, in December, 1869 he opened a store, from which grew the nation-wide business that bears the Eaton name. Endowed with exceptional business acumen, he pioneered many aspects of retail merchandising in this country.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

CAIRN #6


A stone cairn about 10 feet high stands at the intersection of # 8 Provincial Hwy & the Kinkora Road in Ellice
Township, Perth County, between Stratford & Sebringville. The cairn is surmounted by a wooden log with an axe
embedded in it; however, the axe has disappeared, whether to vandals or necessity is not known.

Erected 1929,

In memory of

Andrew & Eva Seebach,

the first settlers

in Ellice Township

in 1829.


The next4 plaques were sent in by Don Holmes & Marilyn Mills

PLAQUE #7

Location: On the NE corner of Wallace & Elizabeth Streets, Listowel

THE FOUNDING OF LISTOWEL
Among the earliest settlers on the site of Listowel was John Binning who, tradition has it, became the community's first permanent settler in 1852. Within four years D. D. Hay, one of the most enterprising early settlers, had erected a sawmill and a settlement called Mapleton developed. On June 1, 1856, a post office named Listowel was opened and the community, with a population of 200, contained taverns and a general store operated by W. H. Hacking. Ten years later the population had increased to 800 and the settlement became an incorporated Village. The arrival of a branch line of the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway hastened the Village's development and it became a Town with a population of 2,054 in 1875.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #8

Location: On the SE corner of Wallace & Elizabeth Streets, Listowel

ANDREW EDWARD McKEEVER, 1895-1919
A World War 1 flying 'ace', McKeever was born and raised in Elma Township. He enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1916 but, attracted by the life of the fighter pilot, transferred to Britain's Royal Flying Corps once he was overseas. From May 1917 to January 1918 McKeever was posted to the 11th Squadron on the Western Front. An outstanding operator of the two-seater Bristol Fighter, he, with his various observers or gunners, shot down some 30 enemy aircraft during reconnaissance missions and offensive patrols, earning the Military Cross and Bar and the Distinguished Service Order for his "conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty". At the end of the war, McKeever returned home where, shortly afterward, he died as the result of a car accident.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #9

Location: This plaque is installed in the lobby
of The Listowel Memorial Arena, Listowel

DEDICATED THIS 29TH DAY OF JANUARY 1984
BY THE
LISTOWEL MINOR HOCKEY ASSOCIATION
IN MEMORY OF
THE RECREATION DIRECTOR AND
SEVEN HOCKEY PLAYERS
WHO LOST THEIR LIVES 25 YEARS AGO
IN THE ARENA COLLAPSE
FEBRUARY 18, 1959

           KENNETH MCLEOD  Recreation Director
           RICKY KAUFMAN        KEITH WIGHT
           JAMES HASTINGS       KENNETH HYMERS
           BARRY SMITH          BRYAN SEEHAVER
                   JACK RHUEBOTTOM

CAIRN #10

Location: This stone cairn about 10 feet high is erected in a Pioneer Cemetery about 10
miles north of Milverton and 1 mile south of Carthage on the west side of the former Provincial
Highway # 19. The cairn is surmounted by a symbolic log and axe made of concrete.

1854-1957
ERECTED
IN MEMORY OF
THE PIONEERS
OF MORNINGTON
TOWNSHIP
By The
Township of Mornington

The next 5 plaques were sent in by Don Holmes & Marilyn Mills

MONUMENT #11


HAIL TO THE PIONEER
1832       IN MEMORIAM        1936
TO THE
PIONEERS OF NORTHEAST HOPE

The settlement began AD 1832

The hemlock and the cedar
The spruce and monarch pine
Waved o’er the tents of Kedar
Where all the harvests shine

But who can tell the story     From dawn to dusk they wrought it
Of all the toil and stress     They smote it left and right
That wrought a land of glory   With blood and sweat they bought it 
From out the wilderness        Then passed into the night

From highland cot and lowland     Their hands were rough and horny
They wrestled o’er the seas       That ours might gentler be  
They left their homes for no-land The path was steep and thorny
A land of lakes and trees         That gained our liberty
                                           J. Lewis Milligan  

Allen Rev. Daniel Fraser William McTavish Alex Peddie Donald
Amos Wm. Fraser Robert McTavish Don Powell Jeffrey
Anderson Duncan Fisher Alex McFarlane John Padden B.
Anderson John Fisher John McFarlane Peter Quinlan D.
Anderson Peter Fisher James Sr. McFarlane Robert Robertson James
Bell Rev. Wm. Fisher Duncan McFarlane A. Robertson Wm.
Bell David Freeborn James Makins Wm. Robertson Donald
Bell Wm. Freeborn Wm. McDermid John Robertson John
Barton W. Fryfogel Sebastian McDermid Duncan Rankin James
Bates John Grant Alex McDougall D. Rennie John
Becker Hamilton John McNaughton Wm. Rennie Wm.
Bradley Wm. Hamilton Robert McNaughton Donald Rupp J.
Bradley James Hamilton Archie Martin B. Rupert John
Brown James Hamilton Alex Martin G. Rutherford Sam
Cairns James Hastings J. Marylees Wm. Rutherford John
Cairns John Hart Hugh Marylees George Reynolds Lubis
Callin Joe Haugh David Mongovan Tom Rice John
Cameron John Hay Peter Morley Wm. Riddell A.
Cameron Donald Hay D. McMillan Peter Stewart A.
Campbell J. Hay John McMillan John Stewart J. Laird
Campbell Archie P. Hellmer Andrew McMillan Hugh Stewart Duncan
Capling John Headrick R. McKenzie Murdoch Stewart John
Capling George Hamberger Wm. McIntosh Peter Stewart James
Carroll Henry Hyde George McClellan Peter Stewart Peter
Carroll D. Jones Charles McPherson K. Sanderson Andrew
Cashin Jones Sam McClarty Sanderson John
Collins John Kelly John Murray John Sanderson Peter
Collins James Kilpatrick Wm. Murray Arthur Smith Thomas
Conacher Wm. Kippen Alex McLeish Wm. Smith John
Connors Bob Kippen John McGonegal James Sebben George
Crerar John Kirby John McGuigan M. Sweitzer N.
Crerar A. Kelso Wm. McGillawee Alex Scott F.
Crerar Peter Laing Peter Menzies A. Scott George
Crerar Don Livingstone John Menzies James Sinclair Peter
Crinkley J. Linton J. Nichol Wm. Sinclair James
Curtis J. Lingelbach Wm. Nichol Archie Tytler Walter
Dewar R. Milne Rev. J. Nelson John Thompson Adam
Dow John McNab John O’Day M. Trow James M.P
Dryburgh Wm. McClaren Alex O’Donnell S. Trashcell John
Dunlop Robert McClaren James Patterson Mat Traschell D.
Easson A. McCallum Duncan Patterson Robert Whitney John
Forbes John McCallum George Patterson James Whaley John
Forrest A. McCallum John Patterson William Whaley Sam
Fraser Alex McGregor John Patterson Henry Waddell James
Fraser John McTavish Peter Patterson Andrew Waddell A.
Fraser John M. McTavish John Patterson John Wilson J.
Fraser James McTavish Charles Patterson Walter Wilhelm Peter
Erected by the descendants of the Pioneers A. D. 1936

Unveiled May 28 1936 by His Excellency, Lord Tweedsmuir, Governor-General of Canada.


PLAQUE #12

Location: On the Main Street South (formerly Provincial Hgwy # 19)
in front of the Carnegie Library

THE FOUNDING OF MILVERTON
By 1851 Andrew West, a New York native, had opened a hotel in the recently surveyed township of Mornington. This building was the focal point around which a small community initially known as West's Corners developed. The hamlet grew gradually and a post office was opened in 1854. Ten years later the settlement contained a sawmill, a tannery, two churches and some 200 residents. About 1871 the name of the village was changed to Milverton, reportedly after a town in Somerset, England. With the arrival of the Stratford and Huron Railway in 1877 the market for Milverton's agriculturally based industries was greatly expanded and the thriving community, with a population of about 550, was incorporated as a village by a county by-law effective January 1, 1881.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #13

Location: On the north side of Huron St (# 8 Hgwy)
just west of the County Court House

THE FOUNDING OF STRATFORD
In 1832, some three years after company surveyors had erected shanties near this site, the Canada Company, a large private land settlement agency, initiated the development of " Little Thames" as the market centre for the eastern Huron Tract. By 1834 a tavern, sawmill and grist mill existed here and a year later a post office called Stratford was opened. Settlement was slow until the early 1850s when the advent of the railway and the designation of Stratford as county town transformed the village into a thriving administrative and commercial centre. Expansion of the community was accelerated after 1871 when railway repair yards were located here and in 1885 with a population of 9,000 Stratford was incorporated as a city.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #14

Location: In the driveway of the Old General Hospital, Stratford Ontario

THE MARY BALLANTYNE NURSES' RESIDENCE, A MAGNIFICENT GIFT OF PRACTICAL UTILITY, WAS DONATED BY THE HONOURABLE THOMAS BALLANTYNE, CHAIRMAN OF THE CITY OF STRATFORD GENERAL HOSPITAL TRUST, IN MEMORY OF HIS NOBLE-MINDED WIFE. IT STOOD ON THIS SITE, 1903-1986, AS A SPLENDID MONUMENT TO THE GRANDEUR OF THE MORAL CHARACTER AND THE BENEFICENCE OF TWO AMONGST US WHOSE NAMES WILL NEVER CEASE TO BE REMEMBERED WITH REVERENTIAL ESTEEM AND HONOUR.

100 YEARS OF CARINGS.G.H

1885-1986 A.D.

PLAQUE #15

Location: On Huron St (# 8 Hwy) on the bridge over the Avon River
at the Shakespearean Gardens

TO THE MEMORY OF
R. THOMAS ORR
ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF
PARKS BOARD IN 1904
SERVED FAITHFULLY UNTIL
HIS DEATH 1957
FOR YOU THERE'S ROSEMARY AND RUE:
THESE KEEP SEEMING AND SAVOR ALL THE WINTER LONG:
GRACE AND REMEMBRANCE BE TO YOU
    The Winter's Tale

    Act 1V Scene lll


The next plaque was sent in by Don Holmes & Marilyn Mills

PLAQUE #16

Location: Perth County/ NE Hope Township approximately Lot 20, Concession 6 a large fieldstone
sits by the side of the road with this message and a diagram of a triangulation tower.

Triangulation Tower
In 1913, Geodetic Survey of Canada erected an 85 foot high triangulation tower on the top of the hill facing you. Below the tower and referenced to tablets cemented into adjacent large boulders and to a property corner, lay triangulation station EASTHOPE - 13307. The concrete reference monument to your left (not its original position) was also used as reference to locate the station. This station was part of a network of triangulation stations used to accurately determine the position of points throughout Canada. Once determined these points became the basis for topographical and engineering surveys. The triangulation throughout Southwestern Ontario extended over fairly flat territory. The forest cover and topography necessitated the erection of high towers in order to obtain visibilty between stations. Night sighting - toil and later acetylene lamps- allowed sighting at greater distances than during daylight hours. The triangulation towers of the Geodetic Survey of Canada had two features which were distinctive - they consisted of two towers - one inside the other but not touching. The outlines of both structures were curved for greater rigidity. The inner structure consisted of a tripod, on top of which a very precise surveying instrument (theodolite) was mounted. It was surrounded by a four-legged scaffold which carried ladders, floors and lamp stands. Woven guy wires were attached to the top of the scaffold. The need for wooden triangulation towers was first eliminated by steel Bilby towers and later by satellite technology. This wooden tower bowed to a windstorm in May of 1920.

The next plaque was sent in by Dorothy Dahm

PLAQUE #17

Location: on Queen St. beside Town Hall (next to Tim Hortons), St. Marys

FOUNDING OF ST. MARYS
When opening Blanshard Township for settlement in 1839, the Canada Company made an arrangement with Thomas Ingersoll, a brother of Laura Secord, to build mills at "the Little Falls" of the Thames. In 1841-43 he erected a sawmill and a grist-mill and in return obtained 337 acres of land in this vicinity. The mills formed the nucleus of a settlement named St. Marys. In 1854 the community was incorporated as a village. The building of railways, 1857-60, stimulated development and in 1864, when St. Marys became a town, it was already the centre of lumber and limestone quarry industries and the adjacent prosperous agricultural region.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

The next plaque was sent in by Brian Rolfe

PLAQUE #18

Location: Stratford

HOME CHILDREN
Between 1869 and 1939, about 100,000 child immigrants, casualties of unemployment and poverty in Britain, were uprooted from their homes and families. With hopes of giving them new lives in Canada, British agencies sent children to receiving homes like this one. From there, a few of the younger children were adopted into Canadian families, but most were apprenticed as agricultural labourers or domestic servants. Often deprived of education and the comforts of family life, Home Children suffered loneliness and prejudice. Their experience reveals a poignant chapter in Canadian immigration history.

Entre 1869 et 1939, le chômage et la pauvreté en Grande-Bretagne arrachèrent environ 100 000 enfants à leur foyer. Dans l'espoir de leur procurer une vie meilleure, des agences britanniques les envoyèrent au Canada dans des hospices comme celui-ci. Par la suite, quelques-uns des plus jeunes furent adoptés, mais la plupart devinrent des ouvriers agricoles ou des domestiques. Souvent privés d'éducation et des joies de la vie familiale, ces petits immigrés subirent les préjugés et connurent la solitude. Leur expérience demeure un témoinage poignant dans l'histoire de l'immigration au Canada.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

The next plaque was sent in by the McRae Family;
Tom, Cathy, Sarah, Daniel, Matthew, Alexander and Nick

PLAQUE #19

Location: on Concession Road 2-3, west off County Road 18, northwest of St. Mary's

RT. HON. ARTHUR MEIGHEN
1874-1960
Born on a farm near here, Meighen graduated from the University of Toronto in 1896, and in 1902 moved to Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, to practice law. In 1908 he was elected to the federal parliament as Conservative member for that riding. He served successively as solicitor-general, secretary of state and minister of the interior under Sir Robert Borden, whome he succeeded as prime minister from 1920 to 1921. He again served briefly as prime minister in 1926. Leader of the opposition 1921-1926, he excelled as an orator and debater. Appointed to the senate in 1932, he resigned in 1942 to contest South York riding, was defeated and retired from politics.

Erected by the Ontario Archeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #20

Location: At the bandshell on Lakeside Drive, Stratford

R. THOMAS ORR 1870-1957
A life-long member of the Stratford Parks Board, R. Thomas Orr was the driving force behind the Stratford parks system. Orr led the fight to save the riverfront and millpond from railway development and oversaw the transformation of the former industrial area into parkland. In 1936, Orr's plans to link Stratford with the birthplace of the English playwright William Shakespeare led to the creation of the Shakespearean Gardens. These parklands provided an inspirational setting in 1953 for the Stratford Shakespearean Festival. During his life of community service, Orr also helped to establish Stratford's library and the war memorial, to extend Highway 7 to Stratford, and to found the Upper Thames River Conservation Authority and the Stratford Historical Society.

Ontario Heriatge Foundation, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #21

Location: On the Avon River footpath on the north shore of the river just east of the Waterloo Street bridge, Stratford

SIR JOHN CUNNINGHAM McLENNAN 1867-1935
An outstandiing Canadian scientist, McLennan was born in Ingersoll and moved to this house in 1883. He attended the University of Toronto where he later became Head of the Physics Department. His research and publications brought international recognition to the University's physics laboratory, which bears his name. A leading advocate of close ties between science, industry and government, McLennan was instrumental in founding the Advisory Council on Industrial and Scientific Research, later the National Research Council. His work in England on the magnetic detection of submarines and the use of radium in the treatment of cancer, his explanation of the yellow-green light in the spectrum of the aurora borealis and his success in liquefying helium, contributed to his world-wide reputation. He was knighted in 1935.

Erected by the Ontario Heriatge Foundation, Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #22

Location: In front of the building at the NE corner of Queen Street and Water Street, Stratford

STRATFORD NORMAL SCHOOL
1908
In the 1900s, concerns about the quality of rural education prompted the Ontario government to build four new Normal Schools to increase the supply of qualified teachers in the province. Identical Italian Renaissance buildings were constructed in North Bay, Peterborough, Hamilton, and Stratford. The Stratford Normal School attracted women and men from surrounding districts and educated them with an emphasis on conditions in the rural schools that employed most new teachers. Known as the Stratford Teachers' College from 1953 on, the school trained close to 14,000 teachers before closing in 1973. It is the only one of the four Normal Schools opened in 1908-09 to survive without substantial alteration.

Ontario Heriatge Foundation, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #23

Location: On the Stratford Festival Theatre grounds near the statue of William Shakespeare, Stratford

TOM PATTERSON, 1920-2005
A native of Stratford, Ontario, Tom Patterson grew up during the Great Depression and dreamed of plans that might revitalize his community. After serving in the Second World War and completing university, he worked as an associate editor for a trade publication in Toronto. During the early 1950s, Patterson began discussing plans to establish an internationally renowned Shakespearean festival in his hometown. Although considered a risky venture by some, Patterson gained encouragement from Mayor David Simpson and the local council, and from British Shakespearean director Tyrone Guthrie. Through determination and perseverance, Patterson was able, in less than two years, to turn his dream into reality. The Stratford Shakespearean Festival opened in July 1953 with a production of Richard III, and created a new standard for North American theatre. Remaining with the Festival until 1967, Patterson was also founding director of the Canadian Theatre Centre and founding president of the National Theatre School. He received numerous honours for his work, including Officer of the Order of Canada (1977).

Ontario Heritage Trust, an agency of the Government of Ontario

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