Historical Plaques of
Lanark County

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PLAQUE #1


Location: On the grounds of the town hall on George St., Lanark

THE LANARK SETTLEMENT 1820
In August, 1820, a government depot was completed on the site of this community to serve as the centre of a military settlement in the newly surveyed townships of Lanark and Ramsay, North Sherbrooke and Dalhousie. by the spring of 1821 some 1,500 settlers, the majority of whom were unemployed Scottish weavers, discharged soldiers, and their families, were established in this area. Placed under the jurisdiction of the quartermaster-general's department, they received land, tools, farm implements and seed from the superintendent, Capt. William Marshall. In July and August 1821, another group of over 1,800 Scottish emigrants arrived. Although some of the land proved unsuitable for agriculture, these pioneers laid the foundation for successful settlement in this region.

Erected by the Ontario Archealogical and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #2


Location: On the NW corner of Craig St. and Drummond St. E., Perth

DISTRICT COURT HOUSE AND GAOL 1843
This excellently proportioned structure was designed in the Neo-classical style by Malcolm McPherson of Perth. It's notable architectural features are the "floating" semi-circular leaded transoms of the central second storey windows and the temple design. The latter was common to all important public buildings of the period, and is here reflected in the dominating pediment and the well defined projection of the central block. The building was erected 1842 - 43 as the court-house and gaol of the Bathurst District. It replaced an earlier court-house which had been built on the site in 1822 when the District was established, but had been destroyed by fire in 1841. Since it's completion the building has served as a centre for local judicial and municipal administration.

Erected by the Archealogical and Historic Sites Board,
Ministry of Colleges and Universities

The following 2 plaques were sent in by Greg and Pat McCabe

PLAQUE #3


Location: In the Mill of Kintail Conservation Area, entrance off Ramsey
Concession Road 8, 5 km north of County Road 16, Mississippi Mills

THE MILL OF KINTAIL AND ROBERT TAIT MCKENZIE
This grist-mill was constructed in 1830 by John Baird, a Scottish pioneer. In 1930 it was restored by Robert Tait McKenzie (1867-1938) the prominent Canadian surgeon, physical educator, and sculptor, as his summer home and studio. Born in Lanark County, McKenzie graduated from McGill, and taught there and at the University of Pennsylvania. He served with the R.A.M.C. in the War of 1914-18 and instituted a plan for the rehabilitation of the wounded. McKenzie is noted for his sculpture of athletes and war memorials, including the Scottish-American War Memorial in Edinburgh.

Erected by the Ontario Archeaological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #4


Location: On the NE corner of County Road 29 and Clayton Rd.,
3 km north of County Road 16, street number 4968, Mississippi Mills

DR. JAMES NAISMITH 1861-1939
This is the boyhood home of James Naismith, the inventor of basketball. Born in a house which formerly stood on this lot, he entered McGill University in 1883 where he was active in athletics. In 1890 Naismith graduated in theology from Presbyterian College, Montreal and subsequently enrolled at the International Y.M.C.A. Training School (now Springfield College) in Massachusetts. There was a need for a competitive team sport that could be played indoors during the winter months, and, there, in December 1891, Naismith devised a game, played under thirteen basic rules, with a ball and two round baskets. He directed physical education at the University of Kansas for thirty-six years and died at Lawrence, Kansas.

Archealogical and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #5


Location: On the NW corner of County Road 16 and Ramsey Concession Road 8,
2 km west of Almonte

"AULD KIRK" 1836
This stone church, an attractive example of an early form of Gothic Revival architecture, was constructed in 1835-36 on land obtained from John Mitchell, one of Ramsay Township's earliest settlers. Built by the local congregation of the Established Church of Scotland it was also attended by Presbyterians from adjoining townships. The early settlers of Ramsay were visited by ministers from Drummond and Beckwith. In 1834 the first resident minister, the Rev. John Fairbairn, was inducted. In January 1864, during the ministry of the Rev. John McMorine (1847-1867), a new church was opened in nearby Almonte. Although little used since then, the "Auld Kirk" stands as a memorial to the pioneer Presbyterian settlers.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

The next 2 plaques were sent in by Sandra R. Horwat

PLAQUE #6


Location: at St. James Anglican Church in the
town of Franktown, Beckwith Township

THE RECTORY OF BECKWITH
Beckwith Township, surveyed in 1817, had among its first settlers discharged military personnel and emigrants from the United Kingdom. The Rev. Michael Harris of Perth administered to the Anglicans until a resident glergyman, the Rev. Richard Harte, arrived from Ireland in 1829. St. James, one of the oldest remaining Anglican churches in the eastern part of Ontario, was largely completed in 1828. In August, 1830, the Rt. Rev. C.J. Stewart, Bishop of Quebec, confirmed 106 candidates here. The rectory of Beckwith was created and endowed with public lands by order-in-council on January 15, 1836. Later called the rectory of Franktown, it served a parish which once included Carleton Place, Smith's Falls, Pakenham and Fitzroy.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #7


Location: on Hwy. #15, Franktown, St. Paul's Church, Beckwith Township

REV. GEORGE BUCHANAN 1761 - 1835
Born at Coupar-Angus, Scotland, Buchanan graduated in medicine from Edinburgh University. He later became a Presbyterian minister and was called to Upper Canada. He arrived in Beckwith Township in August 1822 to become its first resident clergyman. For eleven years Buchanan served as minister, teacher and physician but when, in 1833, a stone church was completed, influential members of the congregation demanded that it be conducted under the auspices of the Church of Scotland. Buchanan, a Secessionist, refused and was barred from preaching in the new church. From then until his death he held services in his home for those of the congregation who supported his views.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

The following Historic Sign was sent in by Judi Montgomery. CLICK HERE to view the bridge, photo courtesy of Judi Montgomery

HISTORIC SIGN #8


Location: Pakenham

1901

PAKENHAM 5 ARCHED STONE BRIDGE

THIS IS THE ONLY STONE BRIDGE
OF ITS KIND ON THE NORTH AMERICAN CONTINENT
LENGTH - 268 ft. WIDTH - 25 ft. HEIGHT - 22 ft.
FIVE 40 ft. ARCHES - PIERS 8ft. THICK
ABUTMENTS AT EACH END 18 ft.
LARGEST STONE IS 9 ft. LONG & 2 1/2 FEET SQUARE
& WEIGHS 5 TONS

BUILT BY O'TOOLE & KEATING, OTTAWA


The next 2 plaques were sent in by Deborah & Geoffrey Wyght

PLAQUE #9


Location: at the bridge, Smith Falls

You can view a photo of the bridge by clicking HERE

SMITHS FALLS BASCULE BRIDGE
LE PONT BASCULANT DE SMITHS FALLS
This Scherzer Rolling Lift bascule bridge is an outstanding early example of a novel concept in movable bridges, developed by William Scherzer, an American engineer. It combines the balanced counterweight of a conventional bascule bridge, with a unique rolling lift motion that all but eliminates friction. Erected in 1912-1913 to carry the Canadian Northern Railway main line across the Rideau Canal, a busy steamboat navigation system, the bridge was renowned for its ease and speed of operation, proving the efficency of the concept.

Voici un excellent example des tout premiers ponts basculants de type Scherzer, érigé selon un concept fort remarquable développé par l'ingénieur américain William Scherzer. L'ouvrage allie le contrpoids aérien d'un pont basculant conventionnel à un mécanisme de roulement exceptionnel qui élimine practiquement toute friction. Construit enm 1912 et 1913 par le chemin de fer Canadien di Nord pour franchir le canal Rideau, une voie de navigation fortement achalandée à l'époche, le pont était révélant l'excellence de sa conception.


Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #10


Location: Gore & Harvey St., Perth

McMARTIN HOUSE

c. 1831

The son of Loyalists from the Morrisburg area, Daniel McMartin (1798 - 1869) established a law practice in Perth in 1823. Well-educated and well-connected, he acquired prominent clients like timber baron Philemon Wright of Hull. McMartin chose a neoclassical design for his residence, then embellished it with unique stylistic features such as recessed arches and a cupola with flanking side lanterns. These are hallmarks of the Federal style of architecture that flourished in the eastern United States from 1780 to 1820. Recognized as a rare Ontario example of this architectural style, McMartin House was acquired by the Ontario Heritage Foundation in 1972, restored to its 1830s appearance, and adapted for community use.

Ontario Heritage Foundation,
an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #11


Location: In the park at the parking area behind the town hall on Market Square, Perth

ALEXANDER MORRIS 1826-1889
An astute public servant who played a significant role in the development of Western Canada, Morris was born in Perth. In 1861, after establishing a successful law practice in Montreal, he was elected to the legislature as the member for Lanark South. An eloquent advocate of the union of British North America, he supported the coalition that made confederation possible. Leaving federal politics in 1872, Morris became interim administrator, then Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba (1872-77) and the North-West Territories (1872-76). Although charged with managing a huge area with disparate groups during volatile times, he successfully introduced responsible government in Manitoba and negotiated treaties with the native peoples. Returning to Ontario in 1878, Morris served in the provincial legislature until his retirement in 1886.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #12


Location: On the east side of 3rd Concession Dalhousie just north of County Road 8,
6 km west of County Road 511, street number 1132

THE DALHOUSIE LIBRARY

In 1828, eight years after the original settlement of this area, the St. Andrew's Philanthropic Society founded the first public library within the old Bathurst District. A log building, known as St. Andrew's Hall, housed the library for many years. The Earl of Dalhousie, Governor-in-Chief of Canada (1820-28), subscribed money for its support and donated a number of books. Thomas Scott, a pioneer settler, was the first president, and among the distinguished citizens who subscribed were the Right Reverend Charles Stewart, Anglican Bishop of Quebec, and Archdeacon John Strachan, later first Anglican Bishop of Toronto. The library was incorporated in 1852 and a number of the original books are in the present community hall.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #13


Location: In Almonte, on the NW corner of Bridge Street and Little Bridge Street

THE FOUNDING OF ALMONTE
The sawmill and grist-mill completed here on the Mississippi River in 1823 by Daniel Shipman provided a nucleus around which a community known as Shipman's Mills had developed by 1824. About 1850 two town plots were laid out here - "Victoria" by Edward Mitcheson and "Ramsayville" by Daniel Shipman. They were combined in 1853 as "Waterford", which in 1855 was renamed "Almonte", probably after Juan N. Almonte, a famous Mexican general and diplomat. The opening of several woollen mills and the completion of a railway to Brockville, fostered the growth of Almonte, which by 1870 was one of Ontario's leading woollen cloth manufacturing centres. Incorporated as a village in 1871, with a population of about 2,000, Almonte was proclaimed a town in 1880.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #14


Location: At the south end of Mill Street, south of Gore Street East, Perth

THE HAGGARTS
John Haggart, a Scottish stone mason, came to Canada in the 1820s and worked on the Welland and Rideau Canals. In 1832 he purchased this property which included the Perth settlements first mill and established a milling complex. He built this house in 1837, an early hip-roofed Regency design in stone. In 1854 the property passed to his son John Graham Haggart. A vigourous politician, the younger Haggart was mayor of Perth before serving some forty years as Member of Parliament for South Lanark. He was Postmaster-General, 1888-92, Minister of Railways and Canals, 1892-96, leader of the Ontario Conservatives in the House, and a top contender for the party leadership in 1895. He died in Ottawa in 1913.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #15


Location: To the left of the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 244, 26 Beckwith Street East, Perth

HERBERT TAYLOR READE, V.C.
1828-1897

Born in Perth, Upper Canada, and educated in Quebec and Ireland, Reade became an assistant surgeon with the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment in 1850. On September 14, 1857, at the siege of Delhi during the Indian Munitny, a number of British wounded were threatened by some 300 Sepoys. Reade led a small party of soldiers against the attackers and drove them off. Two days later he was in the forefront of the final assault on Delhi and, for his gallantry on both occasions, was awarded the Victoria Cross. He later returned to England, rising by 1886 to the rank of surgeon-general and, two years before his death, was made honorary surgeon to Queen Victoria.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #16


Location: On the NE corner of Craig Street and Wilson Street East, 1 block south of Gore Street East, Perth

LAST FATAL DUEL 1833
Here died the victim of the last fatal duel fought in this province, June 13, 1833. Two law students and former friends, John Wilson and Robert Lyon, quarrelled over remarks made by the latter concerning a local school teacher, Elizabeth Hughes. The dispute was aggravated by the prompting of Lyon's second, Henry Le Lievre, a bellicose army veteran. Lyon was killed in the second exchange of shots, while Wilson was acquitted of a charge of murder, married Miss Hughes, and became a member of parliament and a judge.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #17


Location: In the park at the parking area behind the town hall on Market Square, Perth

MALCOLM CAMERON 1808-1876
A prominent Upper Canadian entrepreneur and politician, Cameron was born in Trois-Rivieres. He began his business career in Perth, establishing himself as a general merchant and in 1834 co-founding the Bathurst Courier. In 1837 he moved to Port Sarnia where he developed lumbering, shipping and milling enterprises. Although a successful businessman, Cameron gained renown in politics. He was elected to the legislature as the member for Lanark in 1836 and, representing this, then several western ridings, remained politicially active with only occasional interruptions until his death. Pursuing a generally reform-minded, if sometimes erratic course, he served as minister in the moderate administrations of the 1840s and early 1850s. Cameron is best remembered, however, as an early leader in the radical Clear Grit movement.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #18


Location: In the park at the parking area behind the town hall on Market Square, Perth

PERTH MILITARY
SETTLEMENT 1816
The present townships of Bathurst, Beckwith and Drummond were settled under the jurisdiction of the Quarter Master General's Department. Scottish emigrants, quartered in barracks at Brockville during the winter of 1815-16, and soldiers discharged from the Glengarry Light Infantry and the De Meuron and De Watteville regiments formed a majority of the original settlers. In March 1816, a central depot was established on the site of Perth, and by October the settlement contained some 1500 persons.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #19


Location: On the north side of Drummond Street East just east of North Street North, Perth

REVEREND WILLIAM BELL 1780-1857
One of the most influential Presbyterian clergymen in Upper Canada, Bell was born in Airdrie,Scotland. In 1808 he entered a Congregational academy in London to train for the ministry and, after completing his studies in Scotland and serving as an itinerant preacher, he was ordained by the Associate Presbytery of Edinburgh in 1817. Bell then emigrated to Upper Canada, settling in Perth. With indefatigable energy and missionary zeal he ministered to the Presbyterians in this district for four decades, recording his observations and experiences in his book Hints to Emigrants and in his journals. An uncompromising intense man, Bell also played an important role in the fierce organizational and doctrinal disputes which characterized the early history of the Presbyterian church in the province.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Communications

PLAQUE #20


Location: On the north side of Lombard Street (Highway 15) across from Aberdeen Street,
2 blocks west of Beckwith Street, The Town of Smith Falls

THE RIDEAU WATERWAY
Constructed 1826-32 by the British government for military purposes, but used principally for commerce, the Rideau waterway, together with the lower Ottawa River, was the first canalized route from Montreal to the Great Lakes. Although eastbound traffic continued to use the St. Lawrence, westbound traffic, including many thousands of immigrants, utilized the new route to avoid the hazards and delays of upstream navigation on that river. With the completion, in 1846, of the St. Lawrence canals, use of the Rideau as a commercial thoroughfare declined sharply. However, it remained vitally important to the region by providing its agriculture and industry with economic access to markets. In time the Rideau became one of Ontario's major recreational waterways.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #21


Location: In Almonte, on the NE corner of Almonte Street and Mill Street

THE ROSAMONDS IN ALMONTE
In 1857 James Rosamond built this mill on the Mississippi River, thereby firmly establishing the woollen industry in Almonte. An Irish-born entrepreneur, Rosamond was previously a resident of nearby Carleton Place where, in 1846, he had built one of the first woollen factories in this part of Upper Canada (Ontario). In 1866 his sons, Bennett and William, then in control, expanded the firm by constructing another larger mill in Almonte, and in 1882 Bennett also founded the Almonte Knitting Company. The Rosamonds alliance with Montreal financial interests contributed significantly to their success. By 1890 the Rosamond woollen concerns, at the height of their influence, employed over 500 people in Almonte, then reputedly the seat of the woollen trade in Canada.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #22


Location: On the NW corner of Drummond Street East and Harvey Street,
1 block north of Gore Street East, Perth

SUMMIT HOUSE
This house was built in 1823 by James Boulton, one of Perth's first lawyers. Modelled after "The Grange" in Toronto, the house was designed in the Adamesque style, which was popular in Upper Canada during the 1820s, with overtones of the Regency style, which superceded the Adamesque in the following decade. The graceful fanlight over the main entrance and the oval window in the central gable are typical of the earlier style, whereas the tall first-floor windows and the hip roof reflect the influence of the Regency. The use of brick on a large dwelling at so early a date is rare in this province, and the "Summit House" is one of the first examples, constructed of this material, in the Adamesque or Regency style.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Ministry of Colleges and Universities

PLAQUE #23

Location: On William St. W. at the former railway station now the
Railway Museum of Eastern Ontario, Smith Fall

CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY STATION
Opened in 1914, on the new Toronto-Ottawa line, this station reflected the western-based Canadian Northern's ambition to compete directly with the established Canadian Pacific Railway in populous Ontario in an attempt to achieve Transcontinental status. Probably designed by company architect R.B. Pratt of Winnipeg, the building featured the low profile, linear arrangement and wide projecting eves common to many small stations. Its decorative turret, individualized styling and substantial construction were, however, a signal departure from the Canadian Northern's usual practice of building cheaply from standard plans.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #24

Location: In a park on the SE corner of Franklin and Beckwith Sts.
1 block east of Bridge St., Carleton Place

CAPTAIN A. ROY BROWN, D.S.C.
1893-1944
Victor in aerial combat over Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the First World War's leading fighter pilot and German national hero, Arthur Roy Brown was born at Carleton Place. In 1915 he qualified as a civilian pilot and was commissioned in the Royal Naval Air Service. In the thick of vicious air fighting in 1917-18, Brown is credited with at least 12 enemy planes, earning the Distinguished Service Cross and Bar. Though the Canadian's downing of Richthofen was contested by Australian ground gunners, the official award was given to Captain Brown. Overcoming severe war injuries, he returned to civilian life and later organized an air transport company which served Northern Ontario and Quebec.

Ontario Heritage Trust, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #25

Location: In Lanark, on the outside wall of the Lanark Post Office downtown
on Road 511 on the east side, south of Clarence St.

CHARLES MAIR, 1838-1927
Journalist, poet, advocate of western expansion, and an original member of the Canada First movement, Mair was born at Lanark, Upper Canada. A controversial figure during the Red River uprising (1869-1870), he was subsequently a pioneer businessman of Portage la Prairie, Prince Albert and Kelowna, and an official of the Dominion immigration service. His literary works included Dreamland and Other Poems, Tecumseh, and Through the Mackenzie Basin. He died at Victoria, B.C.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #26

Location: In Almonte, on the NE corner of Mill St. and Little Bridge St.

FORMER ALMONTE POST OFFICE
Begun in 1889 and finished in 1891, this building was erected to house postal and customs services. Federal chief architect Thomas Fuller was responsible for the design and Robert Cameron was the contractor. The building was part of a national programme to provide federal offices in well designed and prominently located structures. This building was influenced by the Romanesque Revival style as the wide voussoirs over the doors and windows illustrate. The steep picturesque roof and richly coloured and carved stone are characteristic of the period.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #27

Location: The SW corner of Flora St. and McRostie St. 1 block south of High St., Carleton Place.

FOUNDING OF CARLETON PLACE
The families of Edmond Morphy and William Moore became in 1819 the first settlers on the site of Carleton Place. About 1822 Hugh Boulton built a mill here on the Mississippi River which provided the nucleus around which a community, known as "Morphy's Falls", had become established by 1824. It also contained a sawmill, stores, a tavern, tannery, ashery and blacksmith's shop, and later a textile mill and stove foundry. A post-office named "Carleton Place" was opened in 1830. The completion of railway lines from Brockville in 1859 and Ottawa in 1870 greatly stimulated the growth of Carleton Place. It was incorporated as a village in 1870 with a population of 1200 and became a town in 1890.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #28

Location: Attached to the wall of a house beside the front door at 100 Naismith Way,
.6 km east of Road 29 3.2 km north of Road 16 in Almonte

JAMES NAISMITH
(1861-1939)
James Naismith, the inventor of basketball, was born on this farm in Ramsey Township. While studying theology in Montréal, he played a number of sports and became interested in the new discipline of physical education. In 1891, as a teacher in Massachusetts, he recognized the need for a new indoor activity to promote fitness in place of the traditional winter routine of marching, gymnastics and calisthenics. Feeling that a non-contact team game was the best answer, he devised the sport of basketball. His game is now played in over one hundred countries around the world.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #29

Location: Next to Maple Heritage Museum at Wheelers Pancake House 1001 Highland Line,
3.7 km south and east of McDonalds Corners Road (Road 12)

MAPLE PRODUCTS
Known and valued by Aboriginal peoples long before the arrival of European settlers, products from sugar maple trees have a rich history in Canada. Their production and trade have played an important role in the economy of the Maple Belt, notably by providing supplementary income that helped ensure the survival of many family farms. After breaking into the international market in 1929, Canada became the world's leading maple products producer and exporter. With the tradition of sugaring-off in the spring, maple syrup symbolizes the end of winter and is associated with Canada's national identity and way of life at home and abroad.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #30

Location: 11 Gore Street East, Perth

Matheson House
Built in 1840 of local sandstone, the Matheson House is an outstanding example of early Scottish-Canadian architecture. Its design is imposing, its stonework remarkably fine, and it occupies a key position in one of the best surviving streetscapes in Canada characteristic of this important architectural tradition. The house was originally owned by the Hon. Roderick Matheson, a prominent citizen of Perth and one of the Dominion's first senators. It remained in the possession of the Matheson family for nearly 100 years.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #31

Location: On the northeast corner of Gore Street East and Harvey Street, Perth

McMARTIN HOUSE
Begun in 1830 for barrister Daniel McMartin (1798-1869), this imposing house symbolizes the wealth and social aspirations of this member of the Tory elite. Born at Williamsburg of Loyalist stock, McMartin attended John Strachan's grammar school at Cornwall. After articling with Chief Justice Sherwood he became one of the first lawyers in Perth, then capital of Bathurst District. The Loyalist Georgian design of the brick and stone house is unusually elaborate, and with its detailing, cupola and lanterns, it reflects American Federal style influence.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #32

Location: 80 Gore Street East across from Basin Street, Perth

PERTH TOWN HALL
Perth's stately town hall is an enduring expression of the vitality and importance of local governments in the 19th century. Erected in 1863-1864, shortly after the town's incorporation, it recalls an era when such buildings served as more than the headquarters for municipal administration. In addition to offices and a council chamber, this town hall originally housed a market, band room, fire hall, police station, post office, as well as a large public hall. The building's elegant, classically inspired design and prominent location testify to its central role in community life.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #33

Location: On the shore of Lake Dalhousie, at the side of Lavant Mill Road
2 km north of Road 12 (McDonalds Corners Road) about 22 km west of Lanark

RIVERS AND STREAMS ACT OF 1884
In the 1870s, Boyd Caldwell and Peter McLaren both owned timber rights on the upper Mississippi River. McLaren built a dam and timber slide at High Falls and refused to let Caldwell use the slide. Caldwell appealed to the Liberal provincial government of Oliver Mowat, which passed the Rivers and Streams Act in 1881. This made it legal to use private improvements on a watercourse if compensation was paid to the owner. McLaren appealed to the courts and to the Conservative federal government of John A. Macdonald. Macdonald disallowed the act three times, to protect the rights of property holders. Mowat and Macdonald disagreed over provincial authority to legislate in matters of property rights, as granted at Confederation. The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council ultimately sided with Caldwell, and Mowat's government passed the Rivers and Streams Act again in 1884. This legal decision recognized that use of Canadian waterways could not be blocked by private interests and helped establish a fundamental principle in federal-provincial relations

Ontario Heritage Trust, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #34

Location: In the Mill of Kintail Conservation Area 7 km from the Mississippi River
in Almonte via west on Road 16 then north on Ramsey Concession 8

ROBERT TAIT McKENZIE
(1867-1938)
Surgeon, educator and sculptor, McKenzie was born in Lanark County, Ontario. After graduating in medicine at McGill University, he became its Medical Director of Physical Training in 1894. A pioneer in physical education, he served as a surgeon with the R.A.M.C. in World War I and developed rehabilitation techniques that were soon widely adopted. He won international acclaim for his sculptures of athletes, while his bronze medallion, the Joy of Effort was mounted at the Olympic Stadium at Stockholm in 1912. His most significant sculpture is the Scottish - American War Memorial in Edinburgh.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #35

Location: In Almonte, on an island in the Mississippi River on the north side of
Rosamond St. E., just west of Mary St. north of Main St. W. (Road 49)

ROSAMOND WOOLEN COMPANY
Between 1840 and 1870 woolen manufacturing emerged as a major Canadian industry. Mills were built in areas such as the Mississippi Valley, where waterpower, labour and wool supplies were abundant. James Rosamond built mills at Carleton Place and Almonte in the 1840s and 1850s. His sons, Bennett and William, began this much larger mill in 1866, in partnership with George Stephen of Montréal. For the next 40 years it was one of the largest, most progressive mills in Canada. The main building's nearly flat roof, stair tower and fenestration are characteristic of late 19th century textile mills in Canada.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

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